1

Here's a great Christmas song. Thanks to Pastor J. over at Lillie-Put for reminding me of this wonderful song.

"Light Of The World"

The world waits for a miracle
The heart longs for a little bit of hope
Oh come, Oh come Emmanuel

The child prays for peace on earth
And she's calling out from a sea of hurt
Oh come, Oh come Emmanuel

And can you hear
The angels singing

Glory to the light of the world
Glory the light of the world is here

The drought breaks
With the tears of a mother
A babies cry is the sound
Of love come down
Come down, Emmanuel

He is the song for the suffering
He is messiah
The Prince of Peace has come
He has come, Emmanuel

Glory to the light of the world
Glory to the light of the world
Glory to the light of the world
Glory to the light of the world
For all who wait
For all who hunger
For all who've prayed
For all who wander
Behold your King
Behold Messiah
Emmanuel, Emmanuel

Glory to the light of the world
Glory to the light of the world
Glory to the light of the world
Behold your King
Behold Messiah
Emmanuel, Emmanuel

The world waits for a miracle
The heart longs for a little bit of hope
O come, O come, Emmanuel

Thanks to AZLyrics.com for these words.

Ben NelsonThanks for coming by,

Merry Christmas,

Ben

 

1

Joseph, I need to talk to you.

[Joseph is working at a lathe]

Yes, dear one?

I really need your full attention. This is important, and it’s not easy for me to say.

I’m sorry—just let me finish this last turn.

There, this chair leg is done. I’m listening. What’s going on?

Can we go somewhere and sit down? It would be better if we were sitting.

Sure, love. What is it? You’re making me nervous.

[they sit]

I’m not sure how to tell you this. I’ve been fretting about it for days. I don’t know how to explain what has happened.

What has happened, what do you mean, what has happened?

What has happened?

Well, do you remember about a week ago, when you came to Abba’s house for dinner and I was very quiet? You kept asking me if something was wrong, and I really never answered you. I think you may have gone home in a bit of a huff, feeling ignored.

Yes, I remember. Your whole appearance was a bit—I don’t know—different that day. Really, it has been ever since. You’ve been very quiet. Is everything alright?

Have you ever had an experience with God, you know, like in the scriptures, visitations, angels, anything like that?

No, not really, though there have been times, during my meditations, that I’ve felt the presence of something, God’s Spirit, I suppose you would say. But, I’ve never seen anything, if that’s what you mean.

Yes, that’s what I mean. Well, I saw something the other night.

Really? What was it? Tell me about it.

It was just after my evening prayers about a week ago. I rose to turn down the lamp, when, without warning, what looked like a man appeared in my chamber. He stood, blocking the door, so I backed up as best I could and put my chair between us.

Who was this man? Who would dare enter your chamber?

Wait Joseph, let me finish.

I knew he couldn’t be a man because he—how can I describe him—he was radiant. He could see that his appearance frightened me so he took a step back and then he began to speak.

"Greetings, favored one! The Lord is with you."

This began to draw me away from fear and toward confusion. What did mean by “The Lord is with you?” Why would anyone call me “favored?” It was an odd greeting.

“Do not be afraid, Mary;” he continued, “for you have found favor with God. And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall name Him Jesus.

Conceive? Bear a son?

Hear me out, Joseph. This visitor continued,

“He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High; and the Lord God will give Him the throne of His father David; and He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and His kingdom will have no end.”

Wait—what are you saying?

Joseph, let me finish. I didn’t understand either. I asked him “How can this be since I am a virgin?” Then the angel said,

"The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; and for that reason the holy Child shall be called the Son of God.”

[standingDid this man touch you—violate you?

It wasn’t a man Joseph, it was an angel. Please sit down, Joseph. The same angel that appeared to my uncle Zachariah before Elizabeth conceived.

[still standingDid this angel violate you?

No, but it did happen just as he said it would. I am with child, Joseph. Somehow God Himself has given me this child?

That’s not how it works, Mary. If you are with child, you know how it happened.
Was it the man who came into your chamber?
Did you know him?
Do I know him?
I could have you stoned! You know that, right?
How could you do this to me—to us?
Why would you throw away our future like this?

Joseph, stop it. [beginning to cry] It’s not like that. I have never known a man in that way. How could you think such a thing?

But, you are with child—pregnant. That’s what you’re telling me? And you’re saying that God made you pregnant without the aid of a man. This is too much to take in.

I love you, Mary, and I will not make a public spectacle of you. But you have disgraced yourself. You have disgraced me—my family—your own family. What am I to do?

Oh Joseph, please believe me.

I cannot believe this. It’s too much, Mary. I’m not sure I could believe it, even if God Himself told me. These things just don’t happen. Not here. Not now.

I won’t shame you. I’ll just get the lawyers to draw up papers of divorce and we’ll be done.

Joseph, no, please.

No Mary, it’s too much.

[Joseph storms out, Mary is left crying, alone.]


To read the original story, see Luke 1:26-55

Copyright - Benjamin Nelson - 2016

Encouter cover samples covers onlyFor more stories brought to life out of the gospels, grab a copy of my book Encounters With Jesus. It has forty stories that will bring the Bible to life in your mind. You'll see the Lord heal lepers, open blind eyes and rise from the tomb.

This book would make a great Christmas present for someone who wants to get to know Jesus in a fresh way.

cropped-BenHeadshot.jpgThanks for coming by today.

See you again soon.

Ben

One last bit of background before we jump into the verse by verse (mostly) look at the Song.

The Song is a short book as compared to other books like Genesis with its 50 chapters or Isaiah with its 66. It is made up of 8 chapters and a total of 117 verses. It would not be a difficult matter to memorize the entire song.

In this short song, there are 470 unique words used by the author.

  • 47 of these words (fully 10%) are not found anywhere else scripture.
  • 51 are used 5 times or less outside of the Song.
  • 45 are used 6 – 10 times.
  • 27 are used 11-20 times.

That leaves us with 300 common words.

Since this is an ancient language, many of these unique words are not found outside the Song either. For this reason, much of what we understand about this work must be derived by context and interpretation.

As striking as these unique words that fill the book, perhaps more strange is what is missing. There is no mention of God in the Song or any of the normal names for God.  But that is not all. It also does not contain any of the major religious words of the Old Testament, such as glory, mercy-seat, throne, ark, ram, ox, bull, altar, offering, evil, law, faithful, truth, atonement, sin, honor, bless, prophet, save and many more. This Song stands distinct from all other literature in the canon of scripture. This uniqueness tends to explain why there are so many different ways people look at this song, and why we need to keep from being too dogmatic about our approach to it.[i]

My Goals:

  • Each one who reads this blog will take the Song into their own prayer life.
  • We would identify ourselves in the Song.
  • We would each see and sense God’s passion for us.
  • We would each see God’s passion for every believer.
  • Each of us will take steps toward greater spiritual maturity. I would define this as, a passion for working with Christ in His ministry toward others.

Come back next week as we start in earnest to look at this wonderful Song of Songs.


[i] The Song of Solomon – an Introduction and Commentary – G. Lloyd Carr – Intervarsity Press – 1984 pp 41-42

BenHeadshotThanks for reading today.

Come back next week.

See you next week.

Ben

1

Take Courage -

by Kristene Dimarco

Slow Down take time     
Breath in he said
He’ll reveal what’s to come



The thoughts in his mind  
Always higher than mine
He’ll reveal all to come


Take courage my heart  
Stay steadfast my soul 
He’s in the waiting    
He’s in the waiting


Hold onto your hope  
As your triumph unfolds  
He’s never failing   He’s never failing 

Sing praise my soul    Find strength in joy
Let his words lead you on 


Do not forget    His great faithfulness
He’ll finish all he’s begun


(And) You who hold the stars
Will call them each by name
You’ll surely keep your promisee to me
That I will rise in your victory 


Thanks to LyricsChords.net for the lyrics above.

BenHeadshotHave a great day.

See you again soon.

Ben

6

Birth of Jesus by Bradly Parish - www.parishfineart.com
Birth of Jesus by Bradley J. Parish - www.parishfineart.com

 

 

As a followup to the story of David I posted yesterday, 'Small Beginnings,' I thought I would re-post some comments from last Christmas. We look at Joseph, Mary's husband, and his relationship to David.

Here's the post from last year:

Have you ever wondered why Joseph lineage traced back to David? I mean, after all, he had no “blood in the game” so to speak. Jesus was "seed of the woman." Joseph was Jesus’ step-father.

I’ve heard it taught that Joseph’s lineage was what give Jesus right to the throne, but wouldn’t there have to be blood for that to be true?

His kingly blood came from momma Mary.

Joseph’s part was not one of blood.

Joseph had one very important part of the puzzle. His lineage took them back to that little town of Bethlehem.

Micah foretold an eternal ruler’s beginning.

"But as for you, Bethlehem Ephrathah,Too little to be among the clans of Judah,From you One will go forth for Me to be ruler in Israel.His goings forth are from long ago,From the days of eternity." - Micah 5:2 NASB

The census decreed by Caesar in the fullness of Mary’s pregnancy required them to go to her husband’s ancestral home town for the counting.

It amazes me. Decade upon decade I’ve read these accounts of our Lord’s birth, and yet every reading exposes another layer. How complex and complete is our Lord’s mastery of time and events! I do so love You Lord.

cropped-BenHeadshot.jpgThanks for coming by.

Merry Christmas.

Ben

2

Small Beginnings

David

In the hour right before the sun comes up the Lord often floods my heart with new melodies. Last week when I was watering Papa’s  flocks at the brook, I started working on a new song. I keep parchment and quill with me in the fields. That’s where I get my best ideas for songs. I keep them in the bag with my supper and breakfast.

Honestly, I’m not even sure I can take credit for many of the poems I write. These songs and poems just come to me in the quiet hours of the night watch. I’ll be talking to the LORD about life—you know—like my family—or something scary that happened—and the most beautiful words come to mind. Sometimes the words come with music, and other times the music comes on a different day. I have a whole collection of words that have no music.

I’m working on a new song right now. This is what I have so far:

My heart is steadfast, O God; 
I will sing, I will sing praises, even with my soul. 

Awake, harp and lyre; 
I will awaken the dawn! 

I will give thanks to You, O LORD, among the peoples, 
And I will sing praises to You among the nations. 
For Your lovingkindness is great above the heavens, 
And Your truth reaches to the skies. 

Be exalted, O God, above the heavens, 
And Your glory above all the earth. 

Sometimes the music comes in the last hour before dawn. It’s really hard to stay awake waiting for the sun to rise, especially during those long winter nights. That’s when I take out my lyre and start playing with tunes and rhythms and the LORD gives me new melodies. That’s how it happened this morning.

As I played this new tune on my lyre, over and over again, fitting in the words and fiddling with the rhythm, something caught my eye. By now it was the middle of the morning.

This time of year I like to keep the flocks up in the north fields, between my papa’s house in Bethlehem and the city of the king, Jerusalem. As I sat with my back to an old olive tree on the hillside facing the house, I noticed a procession heading down the road, coming out of Jerusalem. It was too far away for me to see who it was, or even how many were in their party. But it seemed like something important.

It looked like they were headed toward the center of Bethlehem. They marched past the gate that leads to my house and kept on going toward town.

I went back to my strumming, but I couldn’t help wondering what was going on down there. I’ve seen lots of parades and processions heading toward Jerusalem, but not many headed to my little town. Nothing ever happens in Bethlehem. It's the most boring town in all Israel.

It wasn’t long before I saw a runner heading from the direction of town toward my father’s house. From where I sat, I could see him waiting at the front door.

I was getting more and more curious. Did this have anything to do with the group that headed into town? Why did they want my father?

What happened next seemed even stranger. All my brothers gathered around this runner. First one came out of the house, then another. Next, two came from the shed behind the house where father keeps his tools. The other three came down from the barn. They must have been milking. Soon I could count all seven of my brothers, and Papa following this stranger back toward the center of Bethlehem. A few minutes later, Mama followed, hurrying to catch up.

This week is the first time all of us have been together since Passover. My three oldest brothers just returned from the recent battle with Amalek. They bring home such wonderful stories. Mama doesn’t like it when they tell stories of the war at the dinner table, but I sure do. Last night was the best yet. While we sat around after dinner, my brother Shammah, told us what happened after they clobbered Amalek. Samuel the prophet took a sword and killed their king right in front of the whole army.

“He seemed angry with King Saul,” Shammah told us. “From where we were standing you couldn’t hear much of what was going on, but Samuel looked furious. He was pointing and shouting. Then King Saul fell to his knees. It looked like he was pleading with the old prophet. The next thing I knew, Samuel took Saul’s sword, turned and started walking toward the enemy king.”

“He cut him in pieces before our eyes. It was amazing,” Eliab added. He’s the eldest. He’s not a storyteller himself but loves to throw in some bits when Shammah's talking.

That was when Mama realized I was still in the room. “Don’t you have some sheep to tend?” she said to me. Then to my brothers, she said, “Don’t tell these horrid stories in front of your little brother.”

That’s when I blurted, “I'm not just a little brother. I’m fourteen and a man now, too. I killed a lion last week.”

Mama looked shocked. “You what?”

Shammah laughed, mocking me. “Sure you did, David. Are you sure you weren’t dreaming under that old olive tree again?”

“I did,” I said. “I was out in the fields three days ago when a lion came and took a lamb from the flock. I went out after him and attacked him, and rescued it from his mouth. When he rose up against me, I grabbed him by his beard and I struck him and I killed him.”

Eliab was laughing now, too. “David, get back to your lyre and your little sheep choir. Leave the fighting to us men.”

“Boys,” my mother said with her hands on her hips, fists clenched, “you leave little Davy alone.” Then she turned to me, wagging her finger, “David,” she scolded, “stop telling tales.”

“Maaamaaa,” I whined, “please don’t call me ‘little Davy,’ you know I hate that,” I replied. “And I’m not telling tales. A great lion came across the eastern fields, jumped the fence and went right for the lamb. It was the lamb that was just born three weeks ago.

“There was a bear that tried to attack the flock when I had them down at the brook a few weeks ago. I killed him, too, with my sling. It only took three stones.”

Now all my brothers we groaning and shaking their heads.

“David,” Papa jumped in, “get out to your sheep before your brothers try to take you apart.”

It’s so frustrating. Just because I’m the youngest, they don’t believe anything I tell them. They don’t know how dangerous it can be out here, and how the Lord comes to my side in every kind of trouble.

As I pondered last night's conversation, time passed. I started wondering what was happening in town. It seems like I miss everything while I sit out in the fields tending my father's sheep. My big brothers get in on all the action.

I went back to my tune, but before I had gotten all the way through it, I saw something out of the corner of my eye. It was that runner again. He headed from the house up toward me.

As he approached, he called out, “Are you, David?”

“What?—Uhh—Yes—I’m David—Yes,” I said, a bit nervously.

“Come with me,” he said as he turned back toward town.

“Why?” I called to him but I don’t think he even heard me. He was on the move.

I tucked my lyre back in its satchel and leaned it against the olive tree. I had to run to catch him.

“What’s going on?—Why do you need me?—Who's in town?”

“Just come,” was his only answer.

As we approached the center of Bethlehem, I realized that everyone was there, men and women. The whole town filled the square. In the center of the crowd stood the old prophet, Samuel. I’ve seen him a few times in Jerusalem at the tabernacle during Passover. I noticed smoke rising from where the south road leaves town. They built an altar and had an ox tied nearby.

Then I saw my brothers standing in a line from eldest to youngest facing Samuel. I headed over toward my brothers. Just then, Papa, who was standing with the prophet, called to me.

"David, join us over here,” he said.

I turned into a statue. For a few seconds, I couldn’t move at all. Why did I have to go out into the center of everything? My brother Abinadab gave me a nudge and I turned and slowly walked toward them, not sure what to expect.

As soon as I got to them, the prophet looked into my eyes. He studied me for what felt like an hour. Then he said to my father, “This is the one.” Without breaking his gaze he said, “Get on your knees, son.”

I could hear a few of my brothers take in their breath. My mother was crying. I was still not sure what was going on, but I knelt down before Samuel.

“Papa, what’s going on?” I asked.

He looked at me with a strange smile on his face. It was the kind of look he gave me when I read him one of my poems—like he was proud of me.

“Go ahead and kneel, David, it’s going to be alright,” he assured me.

I smelled the oil before I felt it. Samuel poured his horn of oil out over my head. It ran down my cheeks and between my eyes, then down my shoulders and over all my clothes. As the oil poured out, I sensed the Spirit of the Lord filling me. I’ve known the Spirit’s touch before, but never like this. Like a flood, peace and confidence filled every part of me.

I looked up at Samuel and asked, “What have you done?”

“The Lord has chosen you to replace Saul as king over all Israel,” he answered.

“Replace Saul? King? But I’m just a boy,” I said.

“No son, today you are a king,” Samuel said. “And now we must offer a sacrifice to the Lord."

I didn’t know what to say, but then I remembered the song I’d been working on all morning. As we walked over to where Samuel was going to offer a sacrifice, I started singing:

My heart is steadfast, O God; 
I will sing, I will sing praises, even with my soul. 

Awake, harp and lyre; 
I will awaken the dawn! 

I will give thanks to You, O LORD, among the peoples, 
And I will sing praises to You among the nations. 
For Your lovingkindness is great above the heavens, 
And Your truth reaches to the skies. 

Be exalted, O God, above the heavens, 
And Your glory above all the earth. 

Those around me picked up the last two lines and began to sing with me as we gathered around the altar.

Be exalted, O God, above the heavens, 
And Your glory above all the earth. 

I don’t understand how this can be. Saul is the king, and I’m just a shepherd boy. He leads thousands of men, I lead a few sheep. I’m just a kid from a tiny town. How will the Lord fulfill this promise?

~~~

To read the original story, see 1 Samuel 16:1-13, Psalm 108:1-5,
and 1 Samuel 17:34-35.

Copyright - Benjamin Nelson - 2016

Encounters With Jesus - Available Now
Encounters With Jesus - Available Now

If you enjoyed this story you can find forty more in my book Encounters With Jesus. It takes the reader from Christ's conception to His resurrection through the eyes of dozens who were touched by His ministry.

You can get your copy today in paperback or kindle on Amazon.

Tomorrow, I'll be publishing a brand new, first person account. It's called Small Beginnings. It's the story of the young shepherd boy who became king of Israel. I think you'll like it.

The idea came from an online friend I met on Twitter - Ifeoluwa Fatoki. He blogs at Godly Ideas. You should check it out.

BenHeadshotHave a blessed Lord's day.

See you again soon.

Ben

4

This beautiful 8 chapter love song known as the Song of Solomon or the Song of Songs can be interpreted in various ways. Many of these approaches hold great value. No single point of view captures all that the Song has to offer. Since the song's writing about 3,000 years ago, there have been more commentaries written about the Song that any other book of the Bible save Romans. So there are a great number of ways to approach this book and they vary greatly.

It's as though the Song were a beautiful diamond cut by a master jeweler. Each time you look at this masterwork from a different angle, you discover a new facet of its beauty.

These many interpretations fall into two major categories.

Natural interpretation

The natural interpretation sees the song as an actual account based on a historical relationship. For instance:

  1. A Shulamite maiden and King Solomon (perhaps his first love)
  2. A Shulamite maiden, her shepherd lover and King Solomon–in this case, Solomon is the antagonist.

Allegorical interpretation

In the allegorical interpretation, the characters in the story are fictional representatives of real people and places. This is by far the more common way to interpret the song. The Allegorical comes in many flavors.

Hebrew commentators approach the Song in many ways. Here are a few of the more common views:

  1. God and the Messiah
  2. God and Israel
  3. Messiah and Israel
  4. Torah and Messiah
  5. Torah and Israel

Over the centuries, the Church created its own library of interpretations.

  1. God and the Church
  2. Jesus and the Corporate Church
  3. Jesus and Mary
  4. Jesus and the individual believer
  5. Jesus and a select group of believers – this can be dangerous, and even cultic.

There are some hybrid approaches as well suggesting that the Song contains actual accounts recorded for our example. Paul, of course, tells us that all the stories from the Old Testament also serve as examples for our lives.

My approach will be allegorical. I will assume the Shepherd King represents Jesus and the Shulamite depicts an individual believer.

As we approach scripture with allegory in mind, it is important to lay down a couple rules. It's a little dangerous to approach any scripture as allegory. It's important that we proceed with caution and hold on to some interpretive hand rails.

The first of these handrails is the red letters. Jesus' word's become the plumb line by which we measure all scripture. This will ensure we are not jumping into lines of thought that will lead us astray. Jesus says this:

You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is these that bear witness of Me. (John 5:349 NASB)

This approach turns the table on us, men. How often have we smugly insisted that the women in our lives suffer the indignity of being called 'Sons of God?' In the Song of Songs we get to be the bride of Christ. (I hope you can tell my tongue is firmly planted in my cheek.)

One other thing to note about this approach. While the Song is, for the most part, sequential, it is not entirely so. I have been born and raised in North America, and so I tend to think in timelines. But from what I have observed, much of Middle Eastern thought runs more like spokes and hubs. So there may be times when things seem a bit out of order, but stick with it. All will come together by the end of the Song.

It may take me some time, but if you dig into this little book, I promise you will get more out of it than you ever expected.

Come back next week and look with me at how unique this song is in so many ways.

Thanks for reading today.

See you next week.

Ben
photo credit: Tyler.Meyer via photo pin cc

 

This beautiful 8 chapter love song known as the Song of Solomon or the Song of Songs can be interpreted in many ways. Many of these views hold great value. No single approach captures all that the Song has to offer. Since the song's writing about 3,000 years ago there have been more commentaries written about the Song that any other book of the Bible save Romans. So there are a great number of ways to approach this book and they vary greatly.
You might think of looking at a beautiful Jewel from a variety of angles, or on different backgrounds.

Here are a few possibilities.

Natural interpretation

An actual account based on a historical relationship. For instance:

  1. A Shulamite maiden and King Solomon (perhaps his first love)
  2. A Shulamite maiden, her shepherd lover and King Solomon (in this case Solomon is a villainous character.)

Allegorical interpretation

Here the characters in the story are fictional representatives of real persons and places. This is by far the more common way to interpret the song historically. The Allegorical view can be broken down further.

In Hebrew thought historically the Song has been approached in many ways:

  1. God and the Messiah
  2. God and Israel
  3. Messiah and Israel
  4. Torah and Messiah
  5. Torah and Israel

In the Church there have been various ways of looking at this as well.

  1. God and the Church
  2. Jesus and the Corporate Church
  3. Jesus and Mary
  4. Jesus and the individual believer
  5. Jesus and a select group of believes – this can be dangerous, and even cultic.

There are some hybrid approaches as well suggesting that the Song contains actual accounts that are written (as Paul says of all Old Testament stories) for our example that we may learn from them.

My approach will be allegorical. and I will assume the Shepherd King is Jesus and the Shulamite is every individual believer.

As we approach scripture with allegory in mind, it is important to lay down a couple rules. Much of the Bible is not intended as allegory, and it can be dangerous to go this way without some important hand rails to hold onto.

The first of these hand rails is the red letters. As you can read in the article "Why the Red Letters" Jesus' word's become the plumb line by which we compare all scripture to ensure we are not jumping into lines of thought that will lead us astray. Jesus says this:

You search the Scriptures, because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is these that bear witness of Me. (John 5:349 NASB)

My approach will be predominantly looking at the 4 option in the last set - Jesus and the individual believer.

All you women who are sick and tired of being called "sons of God" in the New Testament, take heart. All you men - get ready to learn to be a bride and wife!

One other thing to note about our approach, while the Song is for the most part sequential, it is not entirely so. I have been born and raised in North America, and so I tend to think in a linear way, but from what I have observed, much of Middle Eastern thought runs more like spokes and hubs. So there may be times when things seem a bit out of order, but stick with it. All will come together eventually.

It may take me some time, but if you dig into this little book, I promise you will get more out of it than you ever expected.

Come back next week and look with me at how unique this song is in so many ways.

Thanks for reading today. Come back next week. If this is your first SOS Saturday, check out the Why page for this theme above.

See you next week.

Ben
photo credit: Tyler.Meyer via photo pin cc

Encounters With Jesus - Available Now
Encounters With Jesus - Available Now

Hi friends,

Looking for the perfect Christmas gift.

I'm having a book sale!

Here's your chance to get Encounters With Jesus for the lowest price ever!

Paperback for only $6.50.

Kindle is an unbelievable $0.99.

These prices go away next Tuesday, so act fast.

Want to know if you would like it before you buy?

Here's are two sample chapters:

Blood in the Sheets

Melee in the Garden

And if you've read and loved this book, as many have, share this sale with your friends. Click the link below to share on Facebook and Twitter. While you're at it, how about writing a review so others can find it more easily on Amazon.com.

cropped-BenHeadshot.jpgThanks for stopping by.

Now - back to your Christmas shopping

See you soon.

Ben

Psalm 100

[A Psalm of praise.]

Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all ye lands.

Serve the LORD with gladness:
come before his presence with singing.

Know ye that the LORD he is God:
it is he that hath made us,
and not we ourselves;
we are his people,
and the sheep of his pasture.

Enter into his gates with thanksgiving,
and into his courts with praise:
be thankful unto him,
and bless his name.

For the LORD is good;
his mercy is everlasting;
and his truth endureth to all generations. Psalm 100:1-5 KJV

Psalm 100:1-5 KJV

I stuck with the good old KJV on this one because the words are so familiar and ignite in me worship from a deep place.

Take a minute to notice the active verbs in this psalm.

Make
Serve
Come
Know
Enter

Let's make our Thanksgiving an active and intentional demonstration of worship today and every day.

cropped-BenHeadshot.jpgThank you for stopping by,

See you again soon,

Ben