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6

In Matthew 20 Jesus gives us a parable that’s full of wonderful images. He paints a scenario from life on the land to teach principles of the kingdom of God.

In this parable He tells of a land owner who owned a vineyard, and needed laborers to work it. I’m guessing harvest was in full swing. He heads to town, to the market, where he knows those looking for work assemble, and five times throughout the day, he hires groups of laborers. He brings people back to his field starting “early in the morning” right up till “the eleventh hour,” with groups starting at the third, sixth, and ninth hours as well.

What can we learn about the kingdom of God from this parable? We must be careful, because each of these “kingdom of God” parables brings out aspects of the kingdom, but they are not meant to be exact descriptions. So without going overboard, let’s jump in for a bit of gleaning. Got your wheel barrow?

For the kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out early in the morning to hire laborers for his vineyard. - Matthew 20:1 NASB

The parable begins with a premise we have lost in our current day. The landowner (the Lord) went to the marketplace (the world) and looked for laborers (those entering the kingdom of God.)

It seems to me those entering the kingdom of God today, often look at it as an escape from work, a place of rest rather than labor. But Jesus speaks of entering into work. In fact this is one paradox of the kingdom.

Come to Me, all who are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and YOU WILL FIND REST FOR YOUR SOULS. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light. - Matthew 11:28-30 NASB

Take my yoke - carry this burden with me, and you will find rest. You see there is some aspect of rest that come from this labor to which we are called.

Don’t get me wrong here. I’m not going to equate the kingdom of God with church, but you would expect church to be populated with folks who are part of the kingdom of God. And yet, in many churches, you find the 80-20 rule in effect. 80% of the work is done by 20% of the people.

Hey—I get it—there are lots of churches out there that are just building their own empires, and not doing the work the Lord set us to. But the CHURCH is supposed to be about the business of bringing in the harvest, and she needs all hands on deck to get this job done.

Church is not meant to be an entertainment venue, but a vocational school. When the body of Christ gathers, it is supposed to be for the equipping of the laborers, for their encouragement and refreshing, so they can work in the field until the sun sets. It’s allowed to be enjoyable. It’s supposed to be excellent. But the goal is to equip believers—laborers—not entertain those standing idle in the marketplace looking for work.

benheadshot1Hey, thank for coming by, and pondering these things with me.

There’s lot more in this parable, so come back again soon.

Ben

4

Wineskins
From: By Book by William Henry Koebel (1872-1926) ."Madeira: Old and New" [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Jesus often spoke in parables, and I want to pick around the edge of one this morning.

The day Jesus called Matthew (a.k.a. Levi the tax collector,) to follow Him, they headed back to Matthew’s home where Matthew hosted a “big reception for Him” (Luke 5:29) This was not some intimate gathering, but rather it was crowded with tax collectors and sinners, and apparently paparazzi, because both the Pharisee’s and the disciples of John the Baptist heard about it.

This big shindig is the setting for today’s Red Letters.

And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; otherwise the new wine will burst the skins and it will be spilled out, and the skins will be ruined. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. And no one, after drinking old wine wishes for new; for he says, 'The old is good enough.' - Luke 5:37-39

As you probably already understand, in that day, they would put their unfermented wine into fresh leather bags, where the wine would age, and give off it’s gasses, and the skin would stretch to accommodate this expansion. As the wine aged, it became less volatile and the wine skins became less flexible.

This wine skin still worked as a perfectly acceptable vessel for other old wines that were past the fermentation stage, but could never again be use for new wine.

Ok, so we get it in the natural, but what was Jesus getting at with this teaching?

Message:

The message of the parable is pretty clear and easy to derive. The new wine He speaks of is the gospel of the kingdom, the good news that the kingdom of heaven is at hand. The old wine skins are the religious folks of the day, who are starting to crack and leak and burst at the seams as they try to take in this new wine.

Audience:

At this point in the reception He is responding to two groups of critics. I think when we approach this parable it is easy for us to point at the Pharisees as the Old School Religious folks He was rebuking, but there is a second group sitting in judgment of His carousing, the disciples of John the Baptist.

John the Baptist was, in Jesus own words, the greatest prophet born of woman. Jesus gave great honor to John. John was the man who fulfilled all those prophesies, like “I send my messenger before Him to make His path straight.” He was the prophet in the spirit of Elijah who every Jewish child knew of because there was always an empty chair at the Passover feast set just for him. John the Baptist was a big deal.

But John’s day was over, and John himself pointed his followers to Jesus.

Again the next day John was standing with two of his disciples, and he looked at Jesus as He walked, and said, "Behold, the Lamb of God!" The two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus. - John 1:35-37

But apparently there were some who had been baptized by John, who gathered together to encourage one another in their resolve to live the fasted and repentant life style John lived in the wilderness. It seems there were pockets of these disciples all over the region, because people came from far and wide to be baptized by John in the Jordan. Decades later Paul ran into some of these folks in Ephesus in Acts 19.

I believe that Jesus spoke this parable not to the Pharisees, but to these disciples of John. The parable for the Pharisees was that of the physician, but to these who were zealous for good works, the Lord has a different message.

These men were asking why Jesus’ disciples did not fast, why they were not living in the austere pattern of repentance that John’s had taught them.

I am sure God had blessed them as they walked in repentance. God showed up for them when they fasted. They were attaining some satisfaction in their walk with the Lord as they lived the life John demonstrated for them.

Then they took one look at Jesus hanging out with crowds and joining them in their parties.

The very people who did not repent and follow John were now hosting Jesus, and He was spending time with them. These are the folk that the disciples of John had set themselves against, the drunkards and gluttons.

  • Don’t they know that the way to God is through sacrifice?
  • Doesn’t everything we know about God point to His pleasure in our sacrifice?
  • How can This Man be the Messiah?
  • How can this be a move of God?
  • Isn’t our way of touching God sufficient?
  • This old wine is good enough!
  • And so it has been for the two thousand years since Jesus’ ascension, and so it is today.

God has chosen to reveal Himself to the Church progressively. Every few generations there is a move of God.

The life of the Church is like that river described in Ezekiel 47 that flows from the throne of God. The river is teaming with life, there are trees beside this river that bring healing to the nations, but the banks of the river are dead.

What happens in every generation, or at least in every new move of God is that those in the move, upon the death of its leader, build a Church on the banks of the river.

There was Luther with a break through revelation of the grace of God, and his followers built a church on the banks of the river, and rejected anything that came later. After all, the wine in their wine skin was good enough. What’s wrong with that “old time religion” that was good enough for my grandparents?

The same thing happened with Wesley, and Calvin, and Finney, and Roberts.

Jesus wants to fill your wine skin with new wine, but as you grow stiff and inflexible, you exclude yourself from the ability to grow with what God is doing today, and you  will find yourself on the banks of the river. You will be the ones criticizing ‘those upstarts.’

Lord, will you make me a new wine skin today, so I can be a carrier of new wine to my generation. [Tweet This]

Ben NelsonThanks for coming by today.

Shine where you're screwed in!

Ben

This is a repost from last November, but it spoke to me this morning, so I share it once again with you.

4

I find myself with a bit of a crazy life. I went digging through the archives for something good to share today and found this. It is right out of the middle of a series on the parable of the Wheat and Tares, but it stands alone nicely. If you want to dig into this parable, you can head here for the first one in the series.

 

Wheat

He presented another parable to them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field.

and the field is the world; and as for the good seed, these are the sons of the kingdom; and the tares are the sons of the evil one" (Matthew 13:24, 38 NASB)

Another simple one today – Seed.

The Greek word pretty much preaches itself: the Greek word for seed is sperma.

Here are a couple excerpts from Thayer’s Lexicon (skipping the human seed definitions)

- the seed i.e. the grain or kernel which contains within itself the germ of the future plants
- whatever possesses vital force or life giving power
- of divine energy of the Holy Spirit operating within the soul by which we are regenerated

Seed
Seed

In the last parable – (the Parable of the Soils) the seed was the Word of God planted in us to impregnate us with truth and the life of God.

Boy – that’ll preach brother Ben.

In this parable the good seed are the sons of the kingdom.

So here it is:

  • First the Word of Life – the seed (sperma) of the Lord  - bursting with new, wonderful, abundant life – is planted in your heart
  • You become pregnant – bursting with new, wonderful, abundant life.
  • Then you (sperma) are in turn planted in the earth - bursting with new, wonderful, abundant life.

I love that the Word is seed in me, and I am seed in the world. I am God’s method of bringing that seed (His word – bursting with new, wonderful, abundant life) to a lost and dying world.

Are you wiling to be planted?

It does mean you will have to die, so others can have life.

Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains by itself alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. (John 12:24 NASB)

Today is a great day to die! Just think of the new, wonderful, abundant life you will be creating! [Tweet This]

BenThanks for stopping by today.

See you tomorrow.

Ben

Field photo credit: downhilldom1984 via photopin cc

Seed photo credit: Martin LaBar (going on hiatus) via photopin cc

Thayer's Lexicon via BlueLetterBible.org

2

River of Living Water

In this encounter with the woman at the well, it takes some time for the woman to catch on that Jesus is not talking about natural things.

When He starts talking about living water she says this.

“Sir, You have nothing to draw with and the well is deep; where then do You get that living water? (John 4:11 NASB)

I started to ponder this question. What did Jesus have with which to draw. He was talking about a well, or better, a spring of living water. How was He able to draw from this well of living water?

photo credit: las - initially via photopin cc
photo credit: las - initially via photopin cc

To take water from a fountain you would need a bucket of some sort. (For you who like old lingo substitute the word vessel where I use a bucket.) And in the case of a well, you would need a rope to lower and raise your bucket.

Jesus tells us this 'living water' is the Spirit, but how to find a bucket that can hold this living water? The fact is you actually have to become the bucket, be the bucket, man! [Tweet This]

Jesus laid out a detailed plan for this in Matthew 5:3-11. Religious folks call this the Beatitudes, today we will call it the ‘How to be a bucket list.’

  • Poor in spirit - see you need before God
  • Mourn - confess and forsake your own sin
  • Meek - submitted to the heart of the Father
  • Hungry and thirsty for righteousness - walk in a way than shuns sin in your own life.
  • Merciful - tempered by an unwavering mercy, fed by the mercy you have received.
  • Pure in heart - keeping yourself free from guile, seeking His face daily, hourly,  moment by moment
  • Leading men to peace with their Heavenly Father.

This is the path Jesus laid out to truly blessed life - one flowing with living water.

If you want an abundance of this living water, start with step one and get your bucket on.

BenThanks for coming by today.

See. You tomorrow.

Ben

For lots of detail on this ‘How to be a bucket list’ check out my series on the Beatitudes.

This post was originally posted on February 15, 2013

6

Sometimes cousins can be really different. Here I am showing my age, but do you remember the Patty Duke show? Two teenage cousins who looked exactly alike, but were different in every way – one wild and free, one poised and governed by self control.

The Bible gives us a set of cousins who are likewise considerably different.

'We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.' "For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, 'He has a demon!' "The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, 'Behold, a gluttonous man and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!' Yet wisdom is vindicated by her deeds. - Matthew 11:17-19

How can these two men, John the Baptist and Jesus, the Christ, the Messiah, the Son of God and Son of man, how can they both be servants of the Most High God, and yet be so different?

That’s what the disciples of John wanted to know, and that’s what the Pharisees wanted to know.

There is one area where they were the same.

They did not dance to the world’s tune.

The world is always trying to get us to compromise what the Lord has put before us.

John came as the final chapter of the Old Covenant. His was the closing hymn, the final chord, of a grand mournful requiem. He came preaching and demonstrating the crushing weight of unrepentant sin, and demanding that men change, and then come to be baptized.

So he began saying to the crowds who were going out to be baptized by him, "You brood of vipers, who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? "Therefore bear fruits in keeping with repentance, and do not begin to say to yourselves, 'We have Abraham for our father,' for I say to you that from these stones God is able to raise up children to Abraham. - Luke 3:7-8

Don’t get me wrong, Jesus preached repentance too. I am not saying that repentance is not part of the Christian walk.

But unlike John, who dressed in an itchy shirt, ate bugs and cried in the wilderness, Jesus sat at the dinner table with all kinds of sinners.

There are two very different dinner tables we read of in the life of Jesus, Levi’s table, with tax collectors and sinners, and Simon’s table, with Pharisees and the religious elite.

These are the same two types of people that came out to John.

Neither group could influence either man.

They played the wedding march for John, but he preached a funeral message in the wilderness.

They played a funeral dirge for the Lord, and He drew them to a wedding feast.

How does the world’s tune influence you?

It’s easy to get caught up in trying to play the Christian life to the tune the world is playing, but I suggest to you today, that you tune your dial to the song of heaven.

What music would heaven have you dance to today.

Lord, help me hear from You what song You are singing over me, and let me live my life to Your rhythm. [Tweet This]

Ben NelsonThanks for stopping by today.

See you again soon.

Shine today!

Ben

 

photo credit: mandolux via photopin cc
photo credit: mandolux via photopin cc

I am sitting here taking another read through this last paragraph of the Sermon on the Mount, and a phrase jumps out at me.

And the rain descended, and the floods came, ~ Matthew 7:25

These are the words of Jesus in Matthew 7, describing the house built on responding to the words of Jesus, the house built on the Rock. Here is the whole verse:

And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and burst against that house; and yet it did not fall, for it had been founded upon the rock. ~ Matthew 7:25

But that little chunk carried my mind back to the account of Noah and the Ark he built for the Lord.

It was probably about 20 years ago, and I was reading through the book of Genesis in “Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible” and I learned something truly fascinating. When Noah was told to build an ark, there is one detail that is striking (plenty others too, I am sure, but for today – one detail.)
Noah was told:

Make for yourself an ark of gopher wood; you shall make the ark with rooms, and shall cover it inside and out with pitch. ~ Genesis 6:14

The only details we get on the ark are these 2 materials, the overall size (which, by the way because it was in Hebrew is something about cubits, but if it were in American it would be like 1 ½ football fields, our favorite unit of measure) and the fact that it had a door and a window.

Today I want to talk about pitch. What is pitch? I am guessing it is something like tar, which Noah was instructed to smear as a waterproof coating all over the inside and the outside of the vessel.

Here is what is fascinating. The Hebrew word for pitch (Kafer) is a variant for a word you will no doubt recognize – Kippur – or atonement. You have heard this word used today when the Jewish community celebrates Yom Kippur! This word – Kafer – is only translated pitch in this one place in the entire Bible. Most often it is translated “ransom.”

Just as in Noah’s day when the rains came down and the floods came up, the only safe place was in the Ark, so it is today. [Tweet This] The only safe place to be is in the Ark, and that Ark is Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God slain before the foundations of the earth.

The only reason you will be able to stand before holy God on the day of judgment is because you are in this Ark, which is covered within and without with perfect pitch, the blood of Jesus.

Today is the day of salvation. Get in the Ark!

Jesus said you do that by acting on what He said. Do not be a hearer of the Words of life, and be left outside the Ark when the flood comes.

Surrender your life to Him today.

BenThanks

Ben

Photo Credit - http://mattdabbs.wordpress.com/2011/04/28/dont-throw-your-pearls-to-pigs-matthew-76/

Do not give what is holy to dogs, and do not throw your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces. ~ Matthew 7:6

What is Jesus talking about here?

I have heard this used as a reason not to preach the gospel to folks, as though telling someone about the amazing grace and love of the Father toward them would constitute not only a waste of time, but a breach of the Master’s will.

Though the gospel clearly qualifies as something holy, and would be a candidate for “pearl of great price” status, we know this can’t be the case since Jesus said “Preach the gospel to every creature” this would clearly include the aforementioned dogs and pigs.

So what is He talking about? A prophetic word? Some deep revelation? That is the way I have taught this in the past, but today I noticed something.

Context! Every translation I have looked at has this in the paragraph, the same train of thought as His discourse on judgment.

It flows like this:

Don’t judge unless you are ready to be judged.

Before you point out someone else’s faults, inspect and correct your own life.

Don’t try to correct the dogs and pigs.

In this context let’s take a fresh look at how we might apply this.

First, in this context who are the dogs and pigs? I am thinking – dogs and pigs are a different species.

Therefore if any man is in Christ, he is a new creature; the old things passed away; behold, new things have come. ~ 1 Corinthians 5:17

When you receive Christ, you are changed completely right down to your innermost being – you are a new species. No longer a dog unable to understand, no longer a pig, addicted to every sort of filth.

You are a God man with the Spirit of the creator at work on the inside.

The second big thought here is that godly correction – a brother or sister coming along side you and helping you to get the speck or plank out of your eye – is not just helpful. In the context, it is holy and precious.

David said it this way

Let the righteous smite me in kindness and reprove me; It is oil upon the head; Do not let my head refuse it, For still my prayer is against their wicked deeds. ~ Psalm 141:5

This is a big deal. We need to understand this. So many Christians get their nose out of joint because someone was picking at their lifestyle, or choices, when in reality it is a healing balm.

Clearly we need to learn to administer such holy and precious ointment in a way that brings no harm.

I believe what the Lord is saying is that when we try to correct the behavior and habits of those who don’t know him, we are putting that which is holy before those who can’t understand, and we are tossing the precious pearls of correction down where they will not only be misunderstood, but they will create offence, and the pigs will turn and attack.

I believe the body of Christ (me in particular) could be helped immensely if we would learn to give and receive godly mature advice in a way that is non-toxic.

One last gleaning from this verse. Don’t be surprised when you criticize the world for being, well, worldly, that it turns around and goes on the attack.

The Lord calls us to bring the light and life of the gospel to every creature, but He does not advocate trying to bring moral conformity to them.

When we attempt to change the actions of people without changing their hearts, we end up either with them turning and tearing us apart, or we get a culture of morality which will cause the lost to feel saved, and miss Christ entirely.

What do you think about this? Do our efforts to curb bad behavior backfire on us?

BenSee you again soon

Ben

photo credit: KevinLallier via photopin cc
photo credit: KevinLallier via photopin cc

My question for you today is – What barn are you filling?

Already he who reaps is receiving wages, and is gathering fruit for life eternal; that he who sows and he who reaps may rejoice together. (John 4:36 NASB)

This line from John 4 where we have been dabbling for a couple weeks reminds me of the parable Jesus told about the man who decided he needed bigger barns.

Photo Credit: Cee Neuner - Cee's Photography

And he told them this parable:

“The ground of a certain rich man produced a good crop. He thought to himself,

‘What shall I do? I have no place to store my crops.’

Then he said,

‘This is what I’ll do. I will tear down my barns and build bigger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I’ll say to myself, “You have plenty of good things laid up for many years. Take life easy; eat, drink and be merry.”

But God said to him,

‘You fool! This very night your life will be demanded from you. Then who will get what you have prepared for yourself?’

This is how it will be with anyone who stores up things for himself but is not rich towards God.”

Luke 12:16-21 NASB

Back at the well, Jesus is talking about why He passed on lunch. He took the time to talk with a woman everyone else would have written off, and yet, due to the insight He received from Father, He was able not only to sow good seed, but to reap an eternal harvest.

And off she went to do the same. This brand new Christ follower had a drink of living water, and not only her entire outlook, but also her set of priorities has been rewritten.

She left her water jug behind and went on a mini preaching tour.

Jesus looks at His activity for the morning, as well as those of this fledgling evangelist, and sees the barns of heaven being filled, and spiritual wages being paid out.

These wages He speaks of are another metaphor for the food He was feasting on, of which they were unaware. If you don’t work, you don’t eat – Paul said it of the tangible – Jesus turned it around in the spiritual. If you labor, there are wages, including spiritual food, and a harvest in eternal storehouses.

This was Jesus’ conclusion to the parable of the man and his barn dilemma:

Provide purses for yourselves that will not wear out, a treasure in heaven that will not be exhausted, where no thief comes near and no moth destroys. (Luke 12:33 NASB)

He is talking about a purse full of spiritual wages and heavenly barns full of souls.

Whose field are you laboring in?

Not only is the Lord looking for worshippers, He is also looking for laborers.

He told them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field." (Luke 10:2 NASB)

So grab your bag of seed and sickle and let’s get out there.

Then come back and tell us your stories.

BenSee you tomorrow.

Ben

River of Living Water

She said to Him, “Sir, You have nothing to draw with and the well is deep; where then do You get that living water? (John 4:11 NASB)

I know that this is the Samaritan woman speaking here, and she does not even know what Jesus is talking about yet, but she makes an awesome point.

The well is deep!

What well?

The well from which we draw this living water.

I suppose a deep well, could mean two things. It could mean the water is a long way down (and it is clear this is her meaning) or it could mean once you hit water, you are just scratching the surface.

But Jesus is talking about the living water, which later in John He will explain more thoroughly.

He who believes in Me, as the Scripture said, ‘From his innermost being shall flow rivers of living water.’  But this He spoke of the Spirit, whom those who believed in Him were to receive; for the Spirit was not yet given, because Jesus was not yet glorified. (John 7:38-39 NASB)

So she is exactly correct on both counts.

photo credit: visualpanic via photopin cc
photo credit: visualpanic via photopin cc

First, there is a great gulf fixed between man and this living water – an uncross-able chasm. No rope man could make would be long enough to reach this living water.

Friday I talked about being the bucket, but you still need that rope in order to be baptized or submerged in this living water.

That rope is the cross of Jesus Christ. The only way to get from here to there is through the death and resurrection of our beautiful Lord and Savior.

As to the second sense of the word, she hits a home run. How deep is this living water? How vast the supply?

Consider the words of Paul to the Ephesians:

In whom ye also trusted, after that ye heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation: in whom also after that ye believed, ye were sealed with that Holy Spirit of promise, which is the earnest of our inheritance until the redemption of the purchased possession, unto the praise of his glory. (Ephesians 1:13-14 KJV, emphasis mine)

I used the KJV here because I have always love that phrase ‘earnest of our inheritance.’ There is such promise in it. Earnest means deeply sincere, no messing around, honest and forthcoming.

When someone offers earnest money it demonstrates their ability to pay, and their intent to do so.

If the Holy Spirit of promise (by the way, I love that phrase too) is simply a demonstration that the one who has bought us is coming to get us, if this is a display of the Father’s intentions, if this is ‘a foretaste of glory divine,’ well then, this is one deep well.

The depth of wealth we have in Christ is immeasurable, beyond what we could ask or think. [Tweet This] Nothing compares to life in the Holy Spirit. It is limitless here, and what is to come is beyond human comprehension.

BenThanks so much for reading today.

See you tomorrow

Ben

River of Living Water

In this encounter with the woman at the well, it takes some time for the woman to catch on that Jesus is not talking about natural things.

When He starts talking about living water she says this.

“Sir, You have nothing to draw with and the well is deep; where then do You get that living water? (John 4:11 NASB)

I started to ponder this question. What did Jesus have with which to draw. He was talking about a well, or better, a spring of living water. How was He able to draw from this well of living water?

photo credit: las - initially via photopin cc
photo credit: las - initially via photopin cc

To take water from a fountain you would need a bucket of some sort. (For you who like old lingo substitute the word vessel where I use a bucket.) And in the case of a well, you would need a rope to lower and raise your bucket.

Jesus tells us this 'living water' is the Spirit, but how to find a bucket that can hold this living water? The fact is you actually have to become the bucket, be the bucket, man! [Tweet This]

Jesus laid out a detailed plan for this in Matthew 5:3-11. Religious folks call this the Beatitudes, today we will call it the ‘How to be a bucket list.’

  • Poor in spirit - see you need before God
  • Mourn - confess and forsake your own sin
  • Meek - submitted to the heart of the Father
  • Hungry and thirsty for righteousness - walk in a way than shuns sin in your own life.
  • Merciful - tempered by an unwavering mercy, fed by the mercy you have received.
  • Pure in heart - keeping yourself free from guile, seeking His face daily, hourly,  moment by moment
  • Leading men to peace with their Heavenly Father.

This is the path Jesus laid out to truly blessed life - one flowing with living water.

If you want an abundance of this living water, start with step one and get your bucket on.

BenThanks for coming by today.

See. You tomorrow.

Ben

For lots of detail on this ‘How to be a bucket list’ check out my series on the Beatitudes.

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