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4

Wineskins
From: By Book by William Henry Koebel (1872-1926) ."Madeira: Old and New" [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Jesus often spoke in parables, and I want to pick around the edge of one this morning.

The day Jesus called Matthew (a.k.a. Levi the tax collector,) to follow Him, they headed back to Matthew’s home where Matthew hosted a “big reception for Him” (Luke 5:29) This was not some intimate gathering, but rather it was crowded with tax collectors and sinners, and apparently paparazzi, because both the Pharisee’s and the disciples of John the Baptist heard about it.

This big shindig is the setting for today’s Red Letters.

And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; otherwise the new wine will burst the skins and it will be spilled out, and the skins will be ruined. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. And no one, after drinking old wine wishes for new; for he says, 'The old is good enough.' - Luke 5:37-39

As you probably already understand, in that day, they would put their unfermented wine into fresh leather bags, where the wine would age, and give off it’s gasses, and the skin would stretch to accommodate this expansion. As the wine aged, it became less volatile and the wine skins became less flexible.

This wine skin still worked as a perfectly acceptable vessel for other old wines that were past the fermentation stage, but could never again be use for new wine.

Ok, so we get it in the natural, but what was Jesus getting at with this teaching?

Message:

The message of the parable is pretty clear and easy to derive. The new wine He speaks of is the gospel of the kingdom, the good news that the kingdom of heaven is at hand. The old wine skins are the religious folks of the day, who are starting to crack and leak and burst at the seams as they try to take in this new wine.

Audience:

At this point in the reception He is responding to two groups of critics. I think when we approach this parable it is easy for us to point at the Pharisees as the Old School Religious folks He was rebuking, but there is a second group sitting in judgment of His carousing, the disciples of John the Baptist.

John the Baptist was, in Jesus own words, the greatest prophet born of woman. Jesus gave great honor to John. John was the man who fulfilled all those prophesies, like “I send my messenger before Him to make His path straight.” He was the prophet in the spirit of Elijah who every Jewish child knew of because there was always an empty chair at the Passover feast set just for him. John the Baptist was a big deal.

But John’s day was over, and John himself pointed his followers to Jesus.

Again the next day John was standing with two of his disciples, and he looked at Jesus as He walked, and said, "Behold, the Lamb of God!" The two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus. - John 1:35-37

But apparently there were some who had been baptized by John, who gathered together to encourage one another in their resolve to live the fasted and repentant life style John lived in the wilderness. It seems there were pockets of these disciples all over the region, because people came from far and wide to be baptized by John in the Jordan. Decades later Paul ran into some of these folks in Ephesus in Acts 19.

I believe that Jesus spoke this parable not to the Pharisees, but to these disciples of John. The parable for the Pharisees was that of the physician, but to these who were zealous for good works, the Lord has a different message.

These men were asking why Jesus’ disciples did not fast, why they were not living in the austere pattern of repentance that John’s had taught them.

I am sure God had blessed them as they walked in repentance. God showed up for them when they fasted. They were attaining some satisfaction in their walk with the Lord as they lived the life John demonstrated for them.

Then they took one look at Jesus hanging out with crowds and joining them in their parties.

The very people who did not repent and follow John were now hosting Jesus, and He was spending time with them. These are the folk that the disciples of John had set themselves against, the drunkards and gluttons.

  • Don’t they know that the way to God is through sacrifice?
  • Doesn’t everything we know about God point to His pleasure in our sacrifice?
  • How can This Man be the Messiah?
  • How can this be a move of God?
  • Isn’t our way of touching God sufficient?
  • This old wine is good enough!
  • And so it has been for the two thousand years since Jesus’ ascension, and so it is today.

God has chosen to reveal Himself to the Church progressively. Every few generations there is a move of God.

The life of the Church is like that river described in Ezekiel 47 that flows from the throne of God. The river is teaming with life, there are trees beside this river that bring healing to the nations, but the banks of the river are dead.

What happens in every generation, or at least in every new move of God is that those in the move, upon the death of its leader, build a Church on the banks of the river.

There was Luther with a break through revelation of the grace of God, and his followers built a church on the banks of the river, and rejected anything that came later. After all, the wine in their wine skin was good enough. What’s wrong with that “old time religion” that was good enough for my grandparents?

The same thing happened with Wesley, and Calvin, and Finney, and Roberts.

Jesus wants to fill your wine skin with new wine, but as you grow stiff and inflexible, you exclude yourself from the ability to grow with what God is doing today, and you  will find yourself on the banks of the river. You will be the ones criticizing ‘those upstarts.’

Lord, will you make me a new wine skin today, so I can be a carrier of new wine to my generation. [Tweet This]

Ben NelsonThanks for coming by today.

Shine where you're screwed in!

Ben

This is a repost from last November, but it spoke to me this morning, so I share it once again with you.

11

Wheat

OK, we have gone long enough talking about the Sabbath, without getting into the Red Letters. Today, I would like to unpack a few of Jesus’ comments about the Sabbath.

The fact is Jesus’ words and actions on and about the Sabbath were a major contributing factors to the Jewish leadership’s hatred for Him.

Let’s jump in.

I want to start with one of Jesus’ most provocative statements:

For the Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath. - Matthew 12:8

This is the end of a story in Matthew 12, one of two piles of trouble Jesus pressed through on a busy Sabbath during His early ministry.

The boys were walking through a grain field, and popping off the heads of the grain in the gleanings and eating them. (Gleanings were the edges of the fields left by the land owners to give the poor and hungry some place to gather food – someday we should talk about God’s welfare plan that included working rather than begging – ooopps did I write that out loud.)

They were breaking so many Sabbath laws – they were “gathering” – they were “preparing food” – they were “eating without washing” – and who knows what else, but they got busted. The Pharisees were right there to point out this problem and quiz the Master.

But Jesus had an answer, three actually. He gave them a theological answer using an example from the life of David. He gave a legal answer, talking about how the priests break the Sabbath in the keeping other laws.

But it all end with Him stating in no uncertain terms “the Son of Man is [aka – I AM] Lord of the Sabbath.” [Tweet This]

Wonder if that got Him in any trouble? Jesus takes on these religious muckety-mucks by simply declaring His own deity.

I hear folks say Jesus never claimed to be God, but you really have to ignore His words to come to that conclusion.

God refers to the Sabbath as “My Sabbath” fifteen times in the Old Testament and yet here Jesus takes ownership, or Lordship over the Sabbath. Jesus is Lord and not just Lord of the Sabbath, although that is a great title for this King of kings and Lord of Lords. He is Lord of all.

Lord Jesus, I worship you today for you are Lord, you are Lord of the Sabbath, and Lord of my life. Have your way today. Reign over this day in my life. – Amen

Ben NelsonThanks for coming by today.
This study is blessing me a bunch, and I hope it’s doing you some good too.
Come back tomorrow. There is lots more from Jesus, and then we will press on to Paul and the writer to the Hebrews. We are not done yet.
Bye for now
Ben

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